ovide‎ > ‎

Aspiring governors debate credibility, 9/25/96

posted Jun 12, 2012, 5:02 AM by Bill Duncan   [ updated Jun 12, 2012, 5:03 AM ]
Document

Start a New Search
Other Formats: Abstract Full Text Printer Friendly
Aspiring governors debate credibility
[City Edition]

Boston Globe (pre-1997 Fulltext) - Boston, Mass.

Author: Royal Ford, Globe Staff
Date: Sep 25, 1996
Start Page: B.6
Section: METRO/REGION
Text Word Count: 453

Document Text


CAMPAIGN '96 / NEW HAMPSHIRE

PORTSMOUTH, N.H. -- In their first head-to-head debate in what promises to be a contentious race for governor, Ovide Lamontagne and Jeanne Shaheen each raised doubts yesterday about whether the other could be trusted to run the state.

Shaheen, with references to Lamontagne's tenure as chairman of the state Board of Education, during which he helped block school districts from receiving $9 million in federal assistance and supported the idea of teaching both creationism and evolution, charged that his fealty to conservative ideology would prevent him from governing fairly.

Lamontagne, a Republican, said he doubts Shaheen because she is a Democrat who has adopted traditional Republican positions, including a vow to veto any general sales or income tax.

Shaheen's tax pledge "defies credibility," he said.

In the hourlong encounter, sponsored by the Greater Portsmouth Chamber of Commerce, the two also tangled over how to improve the business future of New Hampshire, control taxes, and improve education. Another focus was Shaheen's role in battling for deregulation of the electric industry and the fight for lower electric rates in a state with the nation's highest.

On taxes, Lamontagne called himself the more believable fiscal conservative because he shares the New Hampshire "abhorrence to broad-base sales or income taxes."

Shaheen responded that Lamontagne was guilty of "the same old rhetoric" and that she has "never supported, never voted for" a broad-based tax.

Asked how he would improve public education in a state where local property taxes foot most of the school bill, Lamontagne said that as governor he would urge that schools return to a curriculum that emphasizes character and citzenship.

Shaheen countered that Lamontagne, during his years in charge of the state board of education, has "been more concerned with your ideology" than tackling difficult issues.

She faulted him for blocking New Hampshire from obtaining federal funds through the Goals 2000 program, depriving school districts of millions in aid.

With New Hampshire in the midst of deregulating its electric industry and at odds with the Public Service Co. of N.H. and its parent, Northeast Utilities, the two then tangled over Shaheen's claims that she has been a leader in that effort.

Shaheen has been "demogoguing" the issue when, in fact, Republicans, led by Gov. Steve Merrill, had been at the point in the battle, Lamontagne said.

Shaheen, who on the stump has used the fight against the utilities as an example of her ability to work forcefully in a bipartisan way, contended that she had introduced some of the original legislation on behalf of businesses and consumers and that when the issue of electric rates went to court, she was the only legislator signing a friend of the court brief.

Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission.
Abstract (Document Summary)


PORTSMOUTH, N.H. -- In their first head-to-head debate in what promises to be a contentious race for governor, Ovide Lamontagne and Jeanne Shaheen each raised doubts yesterday about whether the other could be trusted to run the state.

Shaheen, with references to Lamontagne's tenure as chairman of the state Board of Education, during which he helped block school districts from receiving $9 million in federal assistance and supported the idea of teaching both creationism and evolution, charged that his fealty to conservative ideology would prevent him from governing fairly.

Lamontagne, a Republican, said he doubts Shaheen because she is a Democrat who has adopted traditional Republican positions, including a vow to veto any general sales or income tax.
Comments